Briefings

Archive September 2021

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Week InAdvance: September 27, 2021

Mon Sep 27 SEC's asset advisors meet. | Tue Sep 28 D&I in the House. | Wed Sep 29 Inaugural EU-U.S. trade-tech summit in Pittsburgh. SEC to reconsider disclosure rules on 'say-on-pay' proxy votes. | Thu Sep 30 Yellen & Powell on the Hill. | Fri Oct 1 Expo 2020 opens in Dubai.

Week InReview: September 24, 2021

Confusion, anxiety, therapy puppies.
 
Citi employee Patrick Moran was one of a number of people to nominate Guide Dogs as their charity partner, and for a very specific reason.
Photos: Citigroup
 
BANKING BOSSES are navigating a complex transition for weary employees who in many cases haven’t been at their desks for 18 months. For the hard-charging finance industry, it’s a balancing act of restoring normalcy while easing back into corporate life at a time Covid is still raging.
 
Citigroup Inc. workers in London were greeted by therapy puppies upon their return this month.
 
— Bloomberg Wealth | Work

Week InAdvance: September 20, 2021

Mon Sep 20 ARRC symposium. Basel Committee. Canada holds snap election. | Tue Sep 21 UN General Assembly opening day. | Wed Sep 22 September Equinox. U.S. rate decision. | Fri Sep 24 ‘Quad’ countries summit of leaders.
 
On Friday, President Joe Biden will host prime ministers Scott Morrison of Australia, Narendra Modi of India, and Yoshihide Suga of Japan at the White House for the inaugural Quad Leaders’ Summit.
 
Rate decisions galore: the FOMC, the BOE, the SNB, Riksbank and Norges Bank, plus central banks in Brazil, Turkey and Indonesia, all hold monetary policy meetings this week. Most of the attention will be focused on the U.K, where the BOE’s eight-member committee is tied four-all on whether the criteria has been met for tightening.
 

Week InReview: September 17, 2021

Got stress?
 
Illustration: Daria Kirpach/WAPO
 
THERE IS A SAYING in the Balkans that loosely translates to: “There is nothing worse than finally seeing the light, only to be plunged again into darkness.” Extraordinary levels of stress and anxiety started to ease, only to be replaced by anger, disappointment and despair as coronavirus cases resurged and the promise of the pandemic’s end became more elusive.
 
The widespread return to in-person school and the uneven return to offices this fall are further contributing to the sense of being pushed to the limit. Although tried-and-true self-help strategies, such as exercise, good sleep, socializing, mindfulness, positive reframing, and self-compassion are still the best prescription for lowering stress overall, sometimes a practical solution that can provide immediate relief is what’s needed.
 
— The Washington Post

Week InAdvance: September 13, 2021

Mon Sep 13 OPEC monthly oil report. | Tue Sep 14 UNGA 76. Apple event. U.S. CPI for August. | Wed Sep 15 CFTC’s energy & environmental panel. Basel Committee meets. | Thu Sep 16 FDIC to explore 'open banking'. | Fri Sep 17 Quadruple witching for markets.
 

Week InReview: September 10, 2021

Feel your life is 'condensed into the computer'?
 
When the eye's not on the prize. One possible symptom of WFH burnout is an increasing sense that you can’t concentrate on your work.
Illustration: John W. Tomac/WSJ
 
MANY AMERICANS are finding that the dehumanizing aspects of working remotely are taking a toll on their ability to stay focused and productive, no matter how many Post-It notes they stick on their walls.
 
At first, the work-from-home life had the elemental thrills of a snow day, with its languid commutes from bed to sofa. But with Covid-19 variants snuffing out the light at the end of the tunnel and companies postponing returns to the workplace, WFH is becoming WTF for many.
 
As we edge toward remote-work burnout, it’s getting harder to stay focused and productive. Even our diversions are digital – “breaks” to play phone games bloat into 30-minute lapses – exacerbating our lack of human connection and our minds’ tendencies to wander.
 
— The Wall Street Journal

Week InAdvance: September 6, 2021

Mon Sep 6 Labor Day holiday in the U.S. and Canada. Markets will be closed. | Wed Sep 8 Fed Beige Book, job openings. | Thu Sep 9 FSOC meets on climate and commercial real estate. SEC investor advisory panel meets. | Fri Sep 10 Renter protection in the House. | Sat Sep 11 Anniversary of 9/11 terrorist attacks.
 
U.S. President Joe Biden will likely make his choice this week on whether to renominate Fed Chair Jerome Powell to a second term. Powell has Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen’s endorsement but faces criticism from vocal House progressives.

Week InReview: September 3, 2021

Travel rethink.
 
Business travel as we’ve known it is a thing of the past, with companies around the world signaling that new communications tools are making travel less of a necessity — and saving a pile of cash in the process. A Bloomberg survey of 45 large businesses in the U.S., Europe and Asia shows that 84% plan to spend less on travel after the Covid-19 pandemic. The ease and efficiency of virtual software, cost savings and lower carbon emissions were the primary reasons cited for the cutbacks. Spending on corporate trips could slide as low as $1.24 trillion by 2024, from a pre-pandemic peak in 2019 of $1.43 trillion. If you are planning a trip, here’s where you can go right now and which countries are still sealed off.
 
— Bloomberg

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