Briefings

Archive September 2020

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Week InAdvance: September 21, 2020

Mon Sep 21 Fed Board meets on Community Reinvestment Act. | Tue Sep 22 September Equinox. Powell, Mnuchin appear before House panel. | Wed Sep 23 SEC to decide whether to adopt new shareholder resolution filing rules. Powell will face questions on the economic fallout from the pandemic and the fiscal stimulus. | Thu Sep 24 SEC's LabCFTC to host Empower Innovation 2020. Powell, Mnuchin testify before Senate Banking Committee. | Fri Sep 25 FSOC meets on secondary mortgage markets and short-term wholesale funding markets.
 
Governments around the world are walking a tightrope between easing coronavirus lockdowns to revive economic growth, and controlling any resurgence of Covid-19. Globally, 30 million people have been infected with the virus, and the death toll is approaching 1 million. Israel is so far the only developed country in the world to go into a second lockdown. Taiwan and Thailand are powering ahead; Europe has seen a jump in cases.
 
New York City has postponed its public school reopenings again, to Oct. 1 for some grades, while Hong Kong plans to resume face-to-face classes in phases.
 

Week InReview: September 18, 2020

#backtowork | Dressing for our new normal.
 
As our work calendars begin to fill again with actual, if socially distanced, professional interactions, round-the-clock loungewear no longer fits the bill. A transitional workplace environment calls for a new kind of hybrid dressing.
 
— The Wall Street Journal

Week InAdvance: September 14, 2020

Mon Sep 14 Bloomberg Green Festival. | Tue Sep 15 U.N. General Assembly virtual gathering. | Wed Sep 16 SEC asset management panel considers whether to "enhance efficiency" for stockholder proposals. | Thu Sep 17 U.S. jobless claims. | Fri Sep 18 Quadruple witching day.
 
Global governments are walking a tightrope between easing coronavirus lockdowns to revive economic growth, and controlling any resurgence of Covid-19. Globally, more than 27 million people have been infected with the virus, and deaths have exceeded 904,000.
 
Greece and Italy plan to reopen schools, while the U.K. brings in stricter rules.
 
La Niña is here, which could mean a cold and stormier winter than normal across the North, while the southern tier stays drier, with warmer than average temperatures.

Week InReview: September 11, 2020

Society disrupted.
 
The advent of the smartphone marked the merging of man and machine. These devices might not be embedded into our forearms just yet, but they have so seismically changed how we operate and interact as humans over the past decade that we’re all effectively cyborgs now. We’re each wholly devoted to these tiny unknowable machines, rarely out of hand or at the very least rarely out of reach.
 
— The Wall Street Journal

Week InAdvance: September 7, 2020

Mon Sep 7 U.S. and Canada celebrate Labor Day. Markets are closed. | Tue Sep 8 Another round of formal Brexit talks. | Wed Sep 9 Fed's emergency lending facilities on Senate Banking's agenda. | Thu Sep 10 ECB meets to set policy. | Fri Sep 11 EU finmins gather. August CPI.
 
Global governments continue to walk a tightrope between easing coronavirus lockdowns to revive economic growth, and controlling any resurgence of Covid-19 with stricter measures. More than 26 million people have been infected with the virus, and deaths have exceeded 863,000.
 
India has seen a record jump in cases and is predicted to soon surpass Brazil for the No. 2 outbreak in the world. Russia passed one million confirmed infections, the fourth nation to reach that grim mark. Thailand has better news — it’s gone 100 days without any local cases. A second wave of cases is ebbing in Australia. Progress on the vaccine front includes a large-scale human trial in the U.S. of AstraZeneca’s shot.

Week InReview: September 4, 2020

Add this to your Covid-19 prevention toolbox...
Strong ventilation
 
Researchers say strong ventilation indoors should accompany other measures to prevent the spread of the virus. Driving the thinking is mounting evidence that the new coronavirus is transmitted through the air among people with prolonged exposure to the pathogen, even when close contact is avoided.
 
Health scientists and mechanical engineers have started issuing recommendations to schools and businesses that wish to reopen for how often indoor air needs to be replaced, as well as guidelines for the fans, filters and other equipment needed to meet the goals.
 
Some businesses have begun taking such steps, but in aging schools nationwide, strengthening ventilation may be difficult. 
 
— The Wall Street Journal

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